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[Recorded] The Knowledge Management Imperative:  Why KM is Essential to AI

Enterprises are increasingly recognizing the critical need for knowledge management (KM) to power cognitive AI. Training a chatbot requires the same organized information that we use to train a human. When you engineer knowledge correctly, you serve the needs of people today and prepare for greater automation in the future. In fact, the long term success of the organization will depend on doing just that – especially when the competition builds high functionality bots that will produce lower costs and better customer service. Those without the capability will not be competitive.

In this webinar, we'll review case studies and methodologies that show how KM supports AI and how to ensure the success of your KM initiative.

What you'll come away with:

  • A framework for building competency and maturity in knowledge operations
  • How to align knowledge operations with AI initiatives.
  • How to build a knowledge creation, application and sharing culture.
  • How to build the business justification for long term investment.

WATCH THE RECORDED WEBCAST

Earley Information Science Team
Earley Information Science Team
We're passionate about enterprise data and love discussing industry knowledge, best practices, and insights. We look forward to hearing from you! Comment below to join the conversation.

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